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February 2005 - News Archive
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Science.gov ALERTS

New Science.gov Service Delivers Science Information to Desktops

"Science.gov, the 'go to' Web portal for federal science information, now provides a free and convenient Alert service that delivers information about the most current science developments right to desktops each Monday.

From the Science.gov homepage (www.science.gov), individuals can set up an account and let Science.gov do the searching for them. Each week, up to 25 relevant results from selected information sources will be sent to the subscriber's email account. Results are displayed in the Alert email and in a personalized Alert Archive, which stores six weeks of alerts results. In the Archive, past activity can be reviewed and Alert profiles edited.

Individuals can choose specific sources to monitor, or select the "All Sources" option. Science.gov drills down into hard-to-find research information collections, spanning more than 47 million pages of government R&D results. More than 1,700 government information resources and 30 databases on a wide variety of scientific topics are available - all in one place and searchable with just one search tool.

Since its launch in 2002, Science.gov, the science companion to FirstGov, has been the one-stop gateway to reliable federal science and technology information. Science.gov allows individuals to search for information based on subject, rather than by government agency.

Science.gov is made possible by the Science.gov Alliance, a collaboration of 12 federal agencies, including the Departments of Agriculture, Commerce, Defense, Education, Energy, Health and Human Services and the Interior, as well as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Government Printing Office, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation, with support from the National Archives and Records Administration."

Source: http://www.science.gov/communications/scigovpr-alerts.html

Added 2/22/05

in-cites: Behind the Scenes Research

in-cites (http://in-cites.com), from ISI - publisher of Web of Science and INSPEC, "provides a behind-the-scenes look at the scientists, journals, institutions, nations, and papers selected by ISI Essential Science Indicators."

in-cites logo

Products available:

Added 2/17/05
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Federal Scientists and Engineers: 1998-2002

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Full Report available at: http://www.nsf.gov/sbe/srs/nsf05304

"This report has two main objectives:

  1. it draws together general and statistical information on the character and status of scientists and engineers employed by the Federal government, and
  2. it presents detailed statistical tables on the characteristics of Federal scientific and engineering employees over the 1998-2002 period.

The tables provide detailed descriptive data of various characteristics of Federal scientists and engineers, including the agency of employment, primary work activity, educational attainment, age, salary, and geographic data.

Finally, the report presents data on Federal scientists and engineers based on occupational definitions of the Scientists and Engineers Data System (SESTAT), the occupational classification system developed within the scientific workforce. The SESTAT system allows readers to compare occupational data collected from other NSF surveys of the U.S. science and engineering workforce. For further information on definitions of Federal scientists and engineers, refer to Section A, Technical Notes."

Added 2/9/05

Eric Weisstein's World of Science

Eric Weisstein's World of Science (scienceworld.wolfram.com) is "written and maintained as a public service for scientific knowledge and education. Although it is often difficult to find explanations for technical subjects that are both clear and accessible, this web site bridges the gap by placing an interlinked framework of mathematical exposition and illustrative examples at the fingertips of every internet user." One can also contribute materials to the growing site.

"Eric Weisstein's World of Science is the recipient of numerous honors and awards. Thousands of people visit each day from countries around the globe, and hundreds of web pages."

 
Added 2/3/05
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